Recent Posts

More Posts

One of the best parts of the current software development environment is the proliferation of Continuous Integration (CI) services like Travis-CI. These CI services plug into GitHub or other code repositories to automatically run when new code is pushed to a repository. Typically CI is used for running automated testing every time new code is added so you can be reasonably confident a change hasn’t broken any functionality. The premise of CI is the automation of tedious tasks like running tests.

CONTINUE READING

Abstract One of the key features of computational experiments is being able to run the experiment over a large variable space. However, in my experience there aren’t tools available to assist with this, particularly in the realm of High Performance Computing (HPC), where bash arrays and loops are commonplace. Using the current toolset, I made lots of errors in the specification of files, turning a ‘quick edit’ into a tedious process of find the bug.

CONTINUE READING

A piece of software I have been using in my reasearch is Hoomd, a ‘relatively’ new package for running Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. These MD simulations have the basic premise of throwing hundreds of balls into a box and shaking it to find out what happens. The relative newness of Hoomd is in comparison to other software packages like LAMMPS and GROMACS which have been around for decades, while the initial release of Hoomd was in 2012.

CONTINUE READING

Competition is a strange thing making you suddenly interested in the most unusual of problems It has become a tradition of The Lancer Band, of which I am a member, to produce a video as part of our ANZAC Day commemorations. These videos have been highly successful garnering millions of views on Facebook and with some choice communications throughout the rest of the year have resulted in a commendable social media following.

CONTINUE READING

In the right (or wrong) hands ssh is a powerful tool for the remote management of a Unix system. Most desktop, or workstation distributions of Linux disable remote access over ssh by default. The simplest method to check if you have ssh server running on your machine is to run $ ssh localhost If ssh is not installed or running this will print out a message ssh: connect to host localhost port 22: Connection refused most likely indicating that the ssh server is not running.

CONTINUE READING